It’s Never Who You Know

Jack is a skilled technician who always delivers above expectations and has 10 clients who know him and would never hesitate to refer him for work.

Joe is a talented artist who knows 100 people who have admired his work but have never bought his work. He has their business cards and he regularly comes across them in the galleries and artists meetups he attends.

Who would you rather be, Jack or Joe? 

To succeed in business, and in life, you must be a Jack, not a Joe. It is never who you know, it is always who knows you and who can vouch for you and the quality of your work. Quality has more value than quantity. Become a master at your craft and you will not have to worry about who you know, because who knows you will regularly bring you business.

Could Your Work Be Your Calling Card?

What do you do for work? Would you still be doing that for work if there was no extrinsic (ie. financial) reward? How well do you do your work, and how much better could you do your work? When was the last time you assessed your efficiency and effectiveness at the work you do?

To work is to function or operate according to design or plan. Assuming you know what you were designed for and you have a plan to operate in alignment with that design, could your work be your calling card?

Are you so proficient at your work that people who are exposed to your craft can recall days, weeks and years later an interaction with you?

Could your work be your calling card?

Are You a Jane?

Jane shows up late at every appointment. Regardless of who she work with or what she works on, it seems that she makes a conscious effort to be late. But she is not all bad. Sometimes when she would be more than 10 minutes late, she would call ahead to inform her colleagues.

Jane has developed a reputation among the people she works with as “the one who is always late.” In addition to being late, Jane is not the best at the work she does. She is just average and even though she does her best, it just does not do it for the people she works with.

What are you know as by people who work with you? Are you “the one who always shows up ahead of time,” or are you a Jane?

“The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential… these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence.” Confucius

Are You Trainable?

If you have ever hired anyone or being part of a hiring panel, you know that one of the most important elements that determines whether someone is picked over another is trainability.

Beyond the appropriate skills and knowledge for the job at hand someone has at any point in time, trainability is what employers want above anything else. Being flexible, being able to adapt, being able to learn challenging concepts while keeping a positive attitude, are invaluable skills.

More than 10 years ago I attended a resume building workshop and the lead trainer who was an HR Director for a medium sized business said: “We always hire for attitude and fire for inaptitude.” What he was effectively saying was that it is easy to get hired if you have a positive and enthusiastic attitude, but over time, your ability to adapt, learn and grow is what is going to determine whether you stay, and how high you rise.

What is Charisma and How do I Develop it?

Charisma is defined by the Oxford Dictionaries as a “compelling attractiveness or charm that can inspire devotion in others.” In the context of effective communication and public speaking, chances are that you have been enthralled by the likes of Martin Luther King, Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, or Tony Robbins. What made those public figures charismatic is not their ability to speak in public (though that surely helped), it is their presence, personal power, and their warmth.

How do you develop those three attributes and become a more charismatic person? You do that by working on improving those attributes in yourself. Let’s briefly look at some action steps:

Presence
You develop a greater presence by building a greater self-awareness. Self-awareness is the capacity for introspection and the ability to recognize oneself as an individual separate from the environment and other individuals. Become sensitive, and responsive to the people and environment around you, as opposed to insensitive and reactive to changes in your space.

Personal Power
Personal power is based on strength, confidence, and competence that individuals gradually acquire in the course of their development. It is self-assertion, and a natural, healthy striving for love, satisfaction and meaning in one’s interpersonal world. To grow your personal power, grow your self-discipline. Discipline is the ability to do what you have to do when you don’t want to do it.

Warmth
The quality, state, or sensation of being warm, enthusiastic, affectionate or kind. This comes from genuinely caring about others and being considerate.

Which one of those qualified do you have, and which one should you probably work on improving?